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China Unveils Future Plans to Launch A Satellite

BEIJING – China plans to launch four new scientific satellite missions by 2023 and scientists have completed conceptual research on five more to be launched in the next 10 years, Xinhua news reported Wednesday.
Chinese scientific satellites launched since 2015 include the Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), the Quantess Experiments at Space Scale (QUESS) and the Hard X-Ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT). These were part of a space science program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).
Wang Chi, director of the National Space Science Center under the CAS, recently told China’s first Space Science Assembly in Xiamen, Fujian Province, in eastern China.
Taiji-1, the first Chinese satellite to conduct in-orbit experiments on key technologies related to the detection of gravitational waves in space, was the first mission of the second phase.
This mission was launched on August 31, 2019 in space.
Among the four new missions is the Gravitational Wave Electromagnetic Counter (GECAM) monitor, scheduled to be launched in late 2020, which will search for electromagnetic signals associated with gravitational waves, Wang said.
The Advanced Solar Observatory in Space (ASO-S), scheduled for launch in late 2021, will help scientists understand solar magnetic fields, coronal mass eruptions and ejections.
The Einstein-Probe (EP) spacecraft, designed to uncover sky-emitting X-ray bodies during violent changes, as well as black holes at rest with transient high-energy radiation, is expected to be launched at the end of 2022.
The Sosphere Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer, or SMILE, is a joint Sino-European mission that is expected to be launched at the end of 2023. It will focus on the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth’s magnetosphere.
Chinese scientists have also completed conceptual research on five satellite missions devoted to the study of physics in extreme space conditions, gravitational wave space sensing, medium-orbit quantum technology experiments, and high, ultra-long wave astronomical observation and the asteroid exploring the comet, Wang said.
Satellites successfully launched in recent years have ushered in a new era for space science development in China, said Wu Ji, president of the China Space Research Society.
However, China is still a newcomer to space science. Compared to several hundred US science satellites, dozens of the European Space Agency and nearly 20 of Japan, the number from China is still low, Wu said.
“Each of China’s scientific satellites is of high quality and I think China could gradually become a major player in the space science field,” said Wu.
(Sahar News Monitoring Desk)

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