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Security Forces Should Not be Used for Political Purposes

Feature: Security Forces Should Not be Used for Political Purposes

As the election crisis deepens in Afghanistan, with transparent vote-counting process not in sight, some of the candidates running for the election are likely to invite their supporters to sit in front of the Independent Election Commission’s (IEC’s) provincial offices as protest. Protesters in some provinces may close the gates of the IEC provincial offices and prevent recounts and audits, as the head of the commission wants. The head of the IEC said he would then ask the interior ministry security forces to disperse the protesters from their provincial offices. The police also have to resort to violence and force protesters out of the entrances of the IEC provincial offices if they are to act.
But the use of police to crack down on protesters and solve electoral problems is futile. This not only deteriorates the political dilemma and the electoral crisis; but also adds to its complexity. The use of police and other forces to respond to the electoral crisis can influence the reputation of the security forces that defend the country and the system. Therefore, high-level government and all electoral groups inside and outside the government should keep this in mind and not allow security forces to be utilized politically.
Ministers of the Armed Forces need to realize that they have a responsibility to prevent their institutions from being reduced to political means. The commanders of the security forces and the ministers of the Armed Forces did not allow the forces to become the victims of political settlement funds. Now the same experience should be used. The security forces have the task of defending the system and the country. They are forces that allowed Mohammad Ghani, Abdullah Abdullah, Hekmatyar, Nabil, Pedram and others to compete in a democratic election. Now that the elections have become critical and the basis of this crisis is political, the forces do not need to step in to solve it.
It is clear that the security forces are required to defend public places, government facilities, private property and the lives of citizens. This task must be fulfilled by the forces in any case. Anyone who resorts to violence must be suppressed by them. Violence is by law a red line for security forces. But the use of legitimate security forces to respond to the electoral crisis runs counter to their existing philosophy.
In the ranks and leadership of the security forces, it has been reinforced that these forces are formed to defend the state and the system, and nothing more. Both the commanders of the security forces and the politicians inside and outside the government must understand that no political or electoral problem can be solved by violence. A glance at recent events in neighboring countries shows that using force has not resolved any political problems. The artificial arrangement for the political issues is never a permanent solution. Election and political controversy can be resolved through dialogue between candidates and political institutions. It would be advisable for the IEC to resume talks with the technical committees of the presidential candidates through the election monitoring bodies. Observer bodies also have concerns about recent IEC decisions that can be resolved in consultation with the IEC in a better and technically acceptable manner.
(Sahar News)

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